Ushers, Lobby Attendants, and Ticket Takers

Description

Assist patrons at entertainment events by performing duties, such as collecting admission tickets and passes from patrons, assisting in finding seats, searching for lost articles, and locating such facilities as rest rooms and telephones.

Tasks

  • Sell and collect admission tickets and passes from patrons at entertainment events.
  • Greet patrons attending entertainment events.
  • Examine tickets or passes to verify authenticity, using criteria such as color or date issued.
  • Guide patrons to exits or provide other instructions or assistance in case of emergency.
  • Maintain order and ensure adherence to safety rules.
  • Provide assistance with patrons' special needs, such as helping those with wheelchairs.
  • Direct patrons to restrooms, concession stands and telephones.
  • Refuse admittance to undesirable persons or persons without tickets or passes.
  • Settle seating disputes or help solve other customer concerns.
  • Assist patrons in finding seats, lighting the way with flashlights, if necessary.
  • Search for lost articles or for parents of lost children.
  • Count and record number of tickets collected.
  • Operate refreshment stands during intermission or obtain refreshments for press box patrons during performances.
  • Verify credentials of patrons desiring entrance into press box and permit only authorized persons to enter.
  • Distribute programs to patrons.
  • Schedule and manage volunteer usher corps.
  • Work with others to change advertising displays.
  • Manage inventory or sale of artist merchandise.
  • Give door checks to patrons who are temporarily leaving establishments.
  • Manage informational kiosks or displays of event signs or posters.
  • Page individuals wanted at the box office.

Knowledge

Production and Processing
Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
Fine Arts
Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.

Skills

Operations Analysis
Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
Learning Strategies
Selecting and using training/instructional methods and procedures appropriate for the situation when learning or teaching new things.
Management of Material Resources
Obtaining and seeing to the appropriate use of equipment, facilities, and materials needed to do certain work.
Operation and Control
Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
Management of Financial Resources
Determining how money will be spent to get the work done, and accounting for these expenditures.
Instructing
Teaching others how to do something.
Technology Design
Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

Abilities

Night Vision
The ability to see under low light conditions.
Response Orientation
The ability to choose quickly between two or more movements in response to two or more different signals (lights, sounds, pictures). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body part.
Wrist-Finger Speed
The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.
Glare Sensitivity
The ability to see objects in the presence of glare or bright lighting.
Peripheral Vision
The ability to see objects or movement of objects to one's side when the eyes are looking ahead.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.
Speed of Limb Movement
The ability to quickly move the arms and legs.
Reaction Time
The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Rate Control
The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.

Work Activities

Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment
Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing machines, devices, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of electrical or electronic (not mechanical) principles.
Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment
Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.

Interests

Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.

Work Style

Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
Social Orientation
Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.

Work Values

Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.

Lay Titles

Admittance Attendant
Cashier
Children's Attendant
Clerk
Customer Service Representative
Customer Service Specialist
Docent
Door Attendant
Door Captain
Door Tender
Doorman
Doorperson
Drive-in Theater Attendant
Floor Staff Worker
Gate Attendant
Gate Tender
Head Usher
Hospitality Associate
Lobby Attendant
Loge Attendant
Museum Host/Hostess
Official Greeter
Press Box Custodian
Program Attendant
Projectionist
Public Safety Officer
Spot Man
Spot Worker
Theater Attendant
Theater Usher
Ticket Agent
Ticket Attendant
Ticket Collector
Ticket Taker
Tour Guide
Usher
Visitor Services Associate
Visitor Services Coordinator
Visitor Services Representative
Visitor Services Specialist
Visitor Services Technician

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$9.01 hourly, $18,730 annual.
Employment (2008):
106,860 employees