Timing Device Assemblers and Adjusters

Description

Perform precision assembling, adjusting, or calibrating, within narrow tolerances, of timing devices such as digital clocks or timing devices with electrical or electronic components.

Tasks

  • Assemble and install components of timepieces to complete mechanisms, using watchmakers' tools and loupes.
  • Observe operation of timepiece parts and subassemblies to determine accuracy of movement, and to diagnose causes of defects.
  • Test operation and fit of timepiece parts and subassemblies, using electronic testing equipment, tweezers, watchmakers' tools, and loupes.
  • Replace specified parts to repair malfunctioning timepieces, using watchmakers' tools, loupes, and holding fixtures.
  • Disassemble timepieces such as watches, clocks, and chronometers so that repairs can be made.
  • Clean and lubricate timepiece parts and assemblies, using solvents, buff sticks, and oil.
  • Examine components of timepieces such as watches, clocks, or chronometers for defects, using loupes or microscopes.
  • Bend parts, such as hairsprings, pallets, barrel covers, and bridges, to correct deficiencies in truing or endshake, using tweezers.
  • Change timing weights on balance wheels to correct deficient timing.
  • Adjust sizes or positioning of timepiece parts to achieve specified fit or function, using calipers, fixtures, and loupes.
  • Mount hairsprings and balance wheel assemblies between jaws of truing calipers.
  • Estimate spaces between collets and first inner coils in order to determine if spaces are within acceptable limits.
  • Bend inner coils of springs away from or toward collets, using tweezers, in order to locate centers of collets in centers of springs, and to correct errors resulting from faulty colleting of coils.
  • Turn wheels of calipers and examine springs, using loupes, to determine if center coils appear as perfect circles.
  • Examine and adjust hairspring assemblies to ensure horizontal and circular alignment of hairsprings, using calipers, loupes, and watchmakers' tools.
  • Review blueprints, sketches, or work orders to gather information about tasks to be completed.
  • Tighten or replace loose jewels, using watchmakers' tools.

Knowledge

Food Production
Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.
Biology
Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
Medicine and Dentistry
Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
Therapy and Counseling
Knowledge of principles, methods, and procedures for diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of physical and mental dysfunctions, and for career counseling and guidance.
Fine Arts
Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.
History and Archeology
Knowledge of historical events and their causes, indicators, and effects on civilizations and cultures.
Philosophy and Theology
Knowledge of different philosophical systems and religions. This includes their basic principles, values, ethics, ways of thinking, customs, practices, and their impact on human culture.

Abilities

Trunk Strength
The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Strength
The ability to exert muscle force repeatedly or continuously over time. This involves muscular endurance and resistance to muscle fatigue.
Stamina
The ability to exert yourself physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath.
Extent Flexibility
The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Gross Body Coordination
The ability to coordinate the movement of your arms, legs, and torso together when the whole body is in motion.
Gross Body Equilibrium
The ability to keep or regain your body balance or stay upright when in an unstable position.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.

Lay Titles

Adjuster
Assembler
Balance and Hairspring Assembler
Banking Pin Adjuster
Barrel Assembler
Barrel Bridge Assembler
Barrel Endshake Adjuster
Calibration Specialist
Calibrator
Chronometer Adjuster
Chronometer Assembler
Chronometer Assembler and Adjuster
Chronometer Balance and Hairspring Assembler
Clock and Watch Assembler
Clock Repairer
Clockmaker
Dial Maker
Electrical Calibrator
Escapement Maker
Escapement Matcher
Hairspring Adjuster
Hairspring Assembler
Hairspring Setter
Hairspring Staker
Hairspring Truer
Hairspring Vibrator
Horologist
Manufacturing Assembler
Pallet Stone Inserter
Pallet Stone Positioner
Poiser
Time Stamp Assembler
Timing Adjuster
Truer
Watch Assembler
Watch Repairer
Watch Technician
Watch Train Assembler
Watchmaker

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$12.31 hourly, $25,600 annual.
Employment (2008):
1,140 employees