Parking Enforcement Workers

Description

Patrol assigned area, such as public parking lot or city streets to issue tickets to overtime parking violators and illegally parked vehicles.

Tasks

  • Patrol an assigned area by vehicle or on foot to ensure public compliance with existing parking ordinance.
  • Maintain close communications with dispatching personnel, using two-way radios or cell phones.
  • Write warnings and citations for illegally parked vehicles.
  • Mark tires of parked vehicles with chalk and record time of marking, and return at regular intervals to ensure that parking time limits are not exceeded.
  • Respond to and make radio dispatch calls regarding parking violations and complaints.
  • Train new or temporary staff.
  • Identify vehicles in violation of parking codes, checking with dispatchers when necessary to confirm identities or to determine whether vehicles need to be booted or towed.
  • Perform simple vehicle maintenance procedures such as checking oil and gas, and report mechanical problems to supervisors.
  • Observe and report hazardous conditions such as missing traffic signals or signs, and street markings that need to be repainted.
  • Investigate and answer complaints regarding contested parking citations, determining their validity and routing them appropriately.
  • Maintain assigned equipment and supplies such as handheld citation computers, citation books, rain gear, tire-marking chalk, and street cones.
  • Provide information to the public regarding parking regulations and facilities, and the location of streets, buildings and points of interest.
  • Appear in court at hearings regarding contested traffic citations.
  • Make arrangements for illegally parked or abandoned vehicles to be towed, and direct tow-truck drivers to the correct vehicles.
  • Perform traffic control duties such as setting up barricades and temporary signs, placing bags on parking meters to limit their use, or directing traffic.
  • Provide assistance to motorists needing help with problems, such as flat tires, keys locked in cars, or dead batteries.
  • Enter and retrieve information pertaining to vehicle registration, identification, and status, using handheld computers.
  • Collect coins deposited in meters.
  • Prepare and maintain required records, including logs of parking enforcement activities, and records of contested citations.
  • Locate lost, stolen, and counterfeit parking permits, and take necessary enforcement action.
  • Wind parking meter clocks.
  • Assign and review the work of subordinates.
  • Remove handbills within patrol areas.

Skills

Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
Equipment Selection
Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
Management of Material Resources
Obtaining and seeing to the appropriate use of equipment, facilities, and materials needed to do certain work.
Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Technology Design
Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Management of Financial Resources
Determining how money will be spent to get the work done, and accounting for these expenditures.

Abilities

Wrist-Finger Speed
The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.

Work Activities

Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates
Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.
Monitoring and Controlling Resources
Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.

Work Style

Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.

Work Values

Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.

Lay Titles

Civilian Service Employee
Community Service Officer
Meter Maid
Parking Control Aid
Parking Control Specialist
Parking Enforcement Monitor
Parking Enforcement Officer (PEO)
Parking Patroller
Parking Security Attendant
Police Cadet
Police Officer
Police Service Technician
Security Officer
Traffic Control Officer

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$17.16 hourly, $35,690 annual.
Employment (2008):
9,210 employees